Normal Breath Sounds

Normal breath sounds, recorded at left upper sternal border. 
First recording segment as heard with stethoscope.

Second segment filtered to remove heart sounds and enhance breath sounds.

 

Contributor: Thinklabs Medical

 

Crackles and Wheezes—Bronchiectasis in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

Adult male Cystic Fibrosis patient, 21 years old, recorded at lateral area of right thorax. Sounds consistent with accumulation of mucus and airway obstruction

as might occur with infection.
 

Contributor: Alda Marques, PhD, Higher School of Health, University of Aviero, Portugal

Wheeze—Asthma

Early inspiratory crackles and late inspiratory fine crackles.

Patient on a ventilator with pulmonary edema.


Contributor: Neale R. Lange, MD, FCCP, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine,

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO

Wheeze

Early inspiratory crackles and late inspiratory fine crackles.

Patient on a ventilator with pulmonary edema.


Contributor: Neale R. Lange, MD, FCCP, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine,

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO

Crackles—Pulmonary Edema

Early inspiratory crackles and late inspiratory fine crackles.

Patient on a ventilator with pulmonary edema.

 

Contributor:  Neale R. Lange, MD, FCCP, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO
 

Wheeze—COPD

Patient with COPD with wheezing. There are dual components to this wheeze, which may suggest that the sounds are emanating

from airways of different diameters.
 

Contributor: Doug Bails, MD; Kendrick Lopez, MD; and Michael Janjigian, MD, FACP; Division of General Medicine, Bellevue Hospital,

New York University School of Medicine 
 

Rhonchi

Intubated patient with low pitched, atonal rhonchi. Note the difference between the rhonchi and the more musical, higher pitched wheezes.

Contributor: Doug Bails, MD; Kendrick Lopez, MD; and Michael Janjigian, MD, FACP; Division of General Medicine, Bellevue Hospital,

New York University School of Medicine

Rhonchi (In Patient with Uremic Pericarditis)

There is a background pericardial rub and rhonchi can be heard as well.


Contributor: Neale R. Lange, MD, FCCP, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO

The Lung Sound Library is a reference collection curated by the Thinklabs Community, captured on Thinklabs stethoscopes, and recorded on smartphones, mobile devices, and laptops.

 

Recordings using Thinklabs stethoscopes are used by online medical journals, medical schools, teaching hospitals, electronic medical textbooks, and many research institutions worldwide.

 

Thinklabs stethoscopes have even been used in live music performances, installation art pieces and other creative projects at leading art schools around the world. Our recordings have also been broadcast on television from live talk shows to the Super Bowl.

 

This online collection is an evolving resource. We welcome contributions from researchers, academics and clinicians. We'd like to hear from you if you have sounds to share, or if you'd like help with your projects.

Pleural Friction Rub

Friction rub—rough low-frequency sound. Inspiratory predominant. Sounds like rubbing two pieces of leather together.
 

Contributor: Doug Bails, MD; Kendrick Lopez, MD; and Michael Janjigian, MD, FACP; Division of General Medicine, Bellevue Hospital,

New York University School of Medicine 
 

Stridor—Infant

Infant, 7 months old. High-pitched inspiratory stridor consistent with epiglottitis or foreign body.

Contributor: Debra L. Weiner, MD, PhD, Emergency Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston,

Harvard Medical School

Stridor (Laryngomalacia in Infant)

Infant, 5 weeks old. Inspiratory and expiratory sounds.


Contributor: Debra L. Weiner, MD, PhD, Emergency Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School

Wheeze Bronchiolitis—7 Month Old

7-month-old patient with bronchiolitis—soft mid-inspiratory wheeze and mid-expiratory wheeze suggests bronchiolar disease.
 

Contributor: Doug Bails, MD; Kendrick Lopez, MD; and Michael Janjigian, MD, FACP; Division of General Medicine, Bellevue Hospital,

New York University School of Medicine 
 

Pulmonary Associated Heart Sounds (PAH)—Split S2

There is a loud Split S2 heard with stethoscope in Diaphragm Mode placed

at the left upper sternal border.

 

Contributor: Michael Janjigian, MD, FACP; Division of General Medicine, Bellevue Hospital,

New York University School of Medicine 

Pulmonary Associated Heart Sounds—Tricuspid Regurgitation

Holosystolic murmur, heard with stethoscope in Bell Mode placed at lower left sternal border.


Contributor: Michael Janjigian, MD, FACP; Division of General Medicine, Bellevue Hospital, New York University School of Medicine

Crackles—Bronchiectasis (in Adult)

Adult male patient 47 years old, recorded at lateral left of the chest.

These are wet crackles, typical of bronchiectasis.


Contributor: Alda Marques, PhD, Higher School of Health, University of Aviero, Portugal